Clinical Specialties : Spasticity

Spasticity

Spasticity is a physical condition that occurs when certain nerve signals do not reach muscles because of injury or disease that affects certain parts of the brain or spinal cord. Common conditions associated with spasticity include cerebral palsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or brain injury. Spasticity is characterized by tight, stiff muscles that make movement, especially of the arms or legs, difficult or uncontrollable.

Severe spasticity can interfere with an individual’s function and/or comfort. It can be very painful and can make simple activities of daily living (e.g. walking, eating, dressing, bathing) time-consuming and difficult for both the individual and caregiver. When spasticity limits activity for long periods, it can cause additional medical problems such as sleep disturbances, pressure sores, and pneumonia.

The following types of treatments are available and may be recommended: management with oral anti-spasticity medications, botox or alcohol injections to affected muscles, physical therapy, intrathecal baclofen therapy, surgical interventions.

Gemayaret Alvarez-Gonzalez, MD
Assistant Professor

Seema R. Khurana, DO
Assistant Professor

Adriana D. Valbuena-Valecillos, MD
Assistant Professor

Kevin L. Dalal, MD
Assistant Professor

Laura Y. Huang, MD
Assistant Professor

Kathya E. Ramos-Vargas, MD
Assistant Professor

Lauren T. Shapiro, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor